Vicksburg Daily Times, March 9, 1872

Vicksburg Daily Times, March 9, 1872

The State Executive Committee and the Convention.

We have received a somewhat lengthy communication – too long for publication – from J. Allen Ross, of Washington county, a member of the state executive committee, protesting in emphatic terms against the proposition to have the delegates to the Philadelphia convention chosen by the executive committee. In 1868 the executive committee appointed delegates to the Chicago convention, but it was not practicable at that time to hold a convention. It is sometimes the case in other states where the committee chooses delegates to national conventions; but it is in our judgment rather an assumption of authority, unless it is generally well understood and agreed to by the party. The choosing of delegates to nominate a candidate for the highest office in the gift of the people, and the designating of presidential electors to cast the vote of a state, is a matter of no inconsiderable importance. There is no good reason why we should not have a state convention to select delegates and choose presidential electors, and as there are several vacancies in the state committee, that had better be reorganized also. We believe that there is but one opinion as to the choice of the Republican party of Mississippi for president; yet a convention is calculated to give us greater harmony, and will do away with any possible excuse for disaffection. As some counties would probably select as a part of their delegation, their members in the legislature, we would therefore suggest to the committee the propriety of calling the convention, if possible, before the adjournment of the legislature. But, in any event, we are decidedly of the opinion that a convention should be held.

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