Jackson Daily News, December 15, 1915

Jackson Daily News, December 15, 1915

INTERESTING SESSIONS OF JACOBS COUNCIL

Negro Organization in Splendid Financial Condition, Reports Show.

The afternoon session of the Supreme Council of the Sons and Daughters of Jacob, in session at Beneficial Hall, was full of interest. Supreme Master L. K. Atwood appointed a committee on the revision of the laws, and that committee was given the idea of the council by a number of addresses of delegates on various phases of the laws requiring betterment. Among those who delivered addresses were Perry W. Howard, W. J. Latham, Calvin N. Miller, T. A. Young of Hernando and P. G. Cooper of Jackson.

The night or public session found the Farish Street Baptist Church crowded to the doors and a crowd that was on the tip-toe of expectancy for the many bright and witty things which are usually gotten off by home people in response to visitors. P. G. Cooper, the attorney, was the master of ceremonies, and there was no time wasted in preliminaries.

The opening number was the presentation of a gavel commemorative of the 33 consecutive years in which L. K. Atwood has been the head of the order. This address was delivered by A. D. Bell, for a long time an active assistant in the headquarters at Jackson. It was full of prophecy for the glorious future which she predicted. The response of L. K. Atwood was full of pathos. He assured his audience that he would not wield this gavel as long as he had done so, but that in future as in the past he would keep in mind that it was the emblem of the authority of the council and not any personal tribute to him.

Perry W. Howard made a notable address, which was well responded to by Virgil L. Reuben, known far and wide as the “black diamond.” The address of Rev. E. R. Twine, pastor of the Farish Street Baptist Church, was notable in many ways. The response by Rev. King R. Brown of Port Gibson brought down the house. The welcome to the homes of the city by the wife of L. K. Atwood was really a classic which produced a profound sensation. It was responded to by L. J. Walker of Vicksburg, one of the veterans of the order.

W. J. Latham on the part of the lawyers and the response of Prof. E. H. McKissack were two entertaining numbers. The welcome on the part of the business men of J. R. Chambless and the response by T. A. Dickson, both of Jackson, were well received. The solos of Z. T. Hubert and A. Cook were especially well rendered. The orchestra and choir of the church rendered appropriate and well selected numbers.

The committee on laws and the revision of the laws met today and adopted the body of the law with a few important changes, which tend to make equal the benefits derived under the various forms of policies.

The Jacobs have for years followed the plan of paying only what they collect, dividing the proceeds of the collections for the month among the beneficiaries of such as have died. Under this rule the policies paid by the order have ranged all the way from $400 to $850, but they have always been promptly met. The order has never had to scale or cut any admitted claim. Its amendments make it impossible for a member who is entitled to a smaller sum to get a larger than another who is of superior right in point of time.

The session this morning was devoted to hearing the reports of the various officers, that of C. N. Miller detaining the payment of some $120,000 in death benefits during the biennial period taking quite half of the time. The report of George W. Butler, supreme secretary, followed. The annual address of L. K. Atwood, supreme master, will take place this afternoon. This is usually an interesting proceeding.

A large number of delegates reached the city yesterday afternoon and last night. Among them are Rev. R. T. Simms, former president of the Baptist State Convention; Daniel Webster of Rolling Fork, and Ella Dade of Muskogee, Okla.

The memorial exercises will take place tonight at Farish Street Baptist Church.

A number of very interesting things will be done. Geo. W. Butler will read the list of the dead of the year, some 214 in number. The invocation will be by Rev. E. O. Woolfolk, pastor of the Methodist Church. Rev. E. P. Jones of Vicksburg will deliver the sermon, while remarks on the lives of the individual dead will be made by L. K. Atwood, C. N. Miller, H. H. Lowe and others. The music will be under the direction of Dr. D. W. Turner. Prof. J. C. J. Wiggins will have the violin and Sadie Folsom the piano.

The local committee in charge of the various functions has on it C. C. Simms, John W. Hair, Joe Smith, T. A. Dickson, W. J. Latham, T. J. Harris, H. B. Dickson and W. P. Thomas.

The roll call this morning showed an attendance very close to the high water mark for the past five years.

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